Vista Bail Bonds Logo
400 South Melrose Drive, #108, Vista CA 92081 • 760-967-7777 •
YouTube YelpVBB
Vista Bail Bonds Box

Loved one or friend
ARRESTED? Call Now!
760-967-7777

Vista Bail Bonds Home

Expedited BAIL by

Vista Bail Bonds Fax
FAX

Courteous, Confidential & Discreet
Easy Quick
PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE

CA Insurance Bail Lic#1841334

PAY WITH:
PayPal

Pay On Your Account With:
PaySimple

Vista Bail Bonds Inc BBB Business Review

SE HABLA ESPAÑOL

Privacy Policy

Vista Bail Bonds®Trademark Guide
Vista Bail Bonds Box bottom
Vista Bail Bonds Office
Map to Vista Bail Bonds and Court

Map of Vista Bail Bonds and Court

 

 

 


Appearance Information


Misdemeanors, felonies and warrants require a court appearance. Rescheduled court appearances will be on the calendar. Advances and continuances may not be included. Please report directly to the courtroom to which you have been assigned. Courtroom doors generally open at 8:30 a.m. If your name is not listed on the calendar and should be, report to the Clerk’s Office for additional information. Present the clerk with any paperwork you have that relates to your case.To appear in court on a non-calendared case, you must report to the Clerk’s Office by 7:30 a.m., Monday through Friday. Present the clerk with any relevant paperwork/information, such as case number, copy of citation, bail/bond receipt, driver’s license number and/or proof of compliance of a court order.

For courtroom appearances, the following rules are enforced:
Shirt and shoes are required in the courtroom.
Tank tops and T-shirts are NOT allowed in the courtroom.
Food, drinks, and gum chewing are NOT allowed in the courtroom.
Weapons are NOT allowed in the courthouse.
Pagers and cell phones must be turned off.

The courtroom is a JUDGES domain and he/she has the last word. If you want to impress the Judge then be courteous, professional, and mature.
Answer ONLY the question asked of you; do NOT try to quickly explain why your version is right. Keep it short, simple, and to the POINT, because chances are it’s not the Judge’s first rodeo and has heard it all before.

Criminal Division
Criminal courts have jurisdiction over infraction, misdemeanor and felony cases. Criminal courts conduct arraignments, criminal readiness, preliminary hearings, trials, motions, sentencing, probation hearings, and Mental Health proceedings.
Criminal cases in San Diego County are heard in the Central, North County, South County, and East County courthouses.

Things to Bring to Court
Proper identification (Driver’s License, Social Security Card, picture identification, etc.) Copy of citation (if applicable) Appearance letter; Any receipts regarding your case.
Any documents which prove compliance with judicial orders and/or sentencing; Money or credit card to pay for fines and fees.
Do not use any nickname or alias; use the same spelling as listed on documents related to the case, and ensure spelling listed on documents is correct – if they are not, advise the Court.
REMEMBER, it’s your responsibility to know your next Court appearance date.
WARNING: If you fail to appear in Court as promised, a warrant will be issued for your arrest and you may be returned to by JAIL.

Misdemeanor
The processing of a misdemeanor usually follows this order:
An arrest is made – police take the defendant to jail. Three things can happen:
The defendant is released – no charges are filed.
The defendant posts bail/bond or is released on his or her own recognizance (“O.R.”) and is scheduled for arraignment.
The defendant remains in the custody and is transported to court for arraignment.

Arraignment
The misdemeanor arraignment is the defendant’s first appearance in court. The following events occur:
The defendant is informed of the charges against him or her.
If the defendant cannot afford an attorney of his or her own choice, an attorney is appointed by the court.
The defendant enters a plea of guilty, not guilty or no contest.
Not Guilty: The defendant states that he or she did not commit the crime.
Guilty: The defendant admits that he or she committed the crime and is in effect, convicted.
No Contest: Also known as “Nolo Contendere.” The defendant does not contest the charge. This plea has the same effect as a guilty plea, except that the subsequent conviction cannot be used against the defendant as evidence of liability in a civil suit.
The defendant is released on his or her “Own Recognizance,” or the court sets bail and the defendant is remanded/committed to the custody of the Sheriff.

Pretrial
At the pretrial hearing, there is an exchange of information between the prosecution and the defense known as discovery. Pretrial motions may also be filed before the start of the trial. Motions may be made to set aside the complaint, to dismiss the case, to suppress evidence, etc. The defendant may at this point change his or her plea to guilty or no contest.

Jury Trial
If the defendant is in custody at the time of arraignment, the trial must begin within 30 days (four weeks plus two days) of arraignment or plea, whichever is later.If the defendant is not in custody at the time of arraignment, the trial must begin within 45 days (six weeks plus three days) of arraignment or plea, whichever is later.If the defendant waives the right to a speedy trial (enters a time waiver or “waives time”) or requests/consents to the case being set beyond the statutory periods, the court must begin the trial within ten days of the day the case is set or continued for trial.Before a trial can begin, a jury must be selected. During the trial, witnesses may testify and evidence will be presented. At the conclusion of the trial, the jury must decide if the defendant is guilty or not guilty. If the jury finds the defendant is not guilty, he or she is released and cannot be tried again for the same crime. If the defendant is found guilty, the case will be continued for sentencing, or the defendant may be sentenced immediately. The defendant may appeal a conviction to the Appellate Department of the Superior Court.

Court Trial
In lieu of a jury trial, the parties may agree to proceed with a court trial, in which the judge hears the evidence and arguments and finds the defendant guilty or not guilty.

 

Felony
The processing of a felony usually follows this order:
An arrest is made – police take the defendant to jail. Three things can happen:
The defendant is released – no charges are filed.
The defendant posts bail/bond and is scheduled for arraignment.
The defendant remains in the custody of the law enforcement agency and is transported to court for arraignment.

Arraignment
A felony arraignment on the complaint is the defendant’s first court appearance. The following events can occur:
The defendant is informed of the charges against him or her.
The defendant is advised of his or her constitutional rights.
If the defendant cannot afford an attorney of his or her own choice, an attorney is appointed by the court.
The defendant enters a plea of guilty, not guilty or no contest.
Not Guilty: The defendant states that he or she did not commit the crime.
Guilty: The defendant admits that he or she committed the crime and is in effect convicted.
No Contest: Also known as “Nolo Contendere.” The defendant does not contest the charge. This plea has the same effect as a guilty plea. A plea of “nolo contendere” to a felony can be used against the defendant as evidence of liability in a civil suit.

Preliminary Hearing
A preliminary hearing is held to determine if there is sufficient evidence for the judge to reasonably infer that the defendant committed the crime and should therefore be “held over” for trial.Once a defendant is “held to answer,” the prosecuting agency files a document called the Information. The defendant will subsequently be arraigned on the Information at which time he or she will enter a plea and proceed to trial.

Jury Trial
The Information must be filed within 15 days of the date the defendant was “held to answer” at the preliminary hearing.The trial must begin within 60 days of the arraignment on the Information, unless the defendant enters a general waiver of the statutory time requirement or requests/consents to a date beyond the 60-day period.Before a trial can begin, a jury must be selected. During the trial, witnesses may testify and evidence will be presented. At the conclusion of the trial, the jury must decide if the defendant is guilty or not guilty. If the jury finds the defendant is not guilty, he or she is released and cannot be tried again for the same crime. If the defendant is found guilty, the case will be continued for sentencing, or the defendant may be sentenced immediately. The defendant may appeal a conviction to the Court of Appeal of the State of California.

Court Trial

Words of thought

Words of thought

In lieu of a jury trial, the defendant may agree to proceed with a court trial, in which the judge hears the evidence and arguments and finds the defendant guilty or not guilty.

 


Click here to view our INTERNET PRIVACY POLICY.
Bail bonds for Vista, Oceanside, Escondido, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Poway, Bonsall, Fallbrook, Ramona, San Marcos, Valley Center and San Diego County.
Vista Bail Bonds® is located directly across Melrose Drive from the Vista jail.
© 1995-2015 Vista Bail Bonds®. "Vista Bail Bonds" is a ® Trademark of Vista Bail Bonds Inc All rights reserved. Phone 760-967-7777 • Serving California and beyond.
This website contains links to other websites. The inclusion of such links does not constitute referrals or endorsement of any of the linked entities.